Following the Egg at Heyday Farm

Bainbridge Island Students Follow The Egg, from Field to Fork, at Heyday Farm

In the Spring Season, Kindergarten students from Bainbridge Island School District study the life cycle of chickens as part of their Edible Education Pathway, developed and facilitated by EduCulture, in their role as Edible Education Liaison for the District.  A major field class for students is a two part learning experience that follows fresh eggs from farm to kitchen at Heyday Farm, a partner farm in the south end of Bainbridge Island.

Students start their learning experience by putting on their farmer’s hat, touring and learning about a local pastured-raised poultry operation with Farmer Brian MacWhorter and his staff.  They learn about how chickens are raised for eggs that feed a community, from where they live, what they eat, to how they behave.  We also discuss how chickens are contemporary relatives of dinosaurs and explore other science and environmental learning connections.  Our instructors help students select fresh eggs from nest boxes, which they then carry to a commercial egg washing machine at the farm’s processing facilities.

Students then bring their eggs to the Heyday Farm Kitchen where they put on their chef’s hat for a culinary experience with Chef Tad Mitsui and his staff.  At the Heyday Kitchen, students learn how to prepare their farm egg as a soufflé with fresh farm ingredients.  While their eggs creations are in the oven, student’s put on their scientist’s hat to engage in hand’s on series of compare and contrast observations between fresh, local farm eggs and store-bought eggs.  Students use all of their senses to examine color, shape, texture, and eventually taste, while exploring the connections between how and where a chicken is raised and the qualities, health and taste of their eggs.  When their soufflé’s are ready, students are guided through a tasting lesson to help them appreciate the flavor, texture and other characteristics of their creations.

These lived, field experiences inform more lived curricular connections for teachers and students.  The outdoor classrooms we have created model effective placed based teaching and learning that is supporting science, math and social studies education. Students see their community as curriculum.  Social & emotional learning is enhanced and enriched through these outdoor, field experience through interaction in natural and agricultural settings, engagement with the life cycle of live animals, and the observation of a sustainable food chain of our local community, and meeting local farmer and chefs.

Educulture has developed and facilitates a more mature version of this Follow the Egg Field Class for students in the Advanced Food Course at Bainbridge High School.

Thank you to Bainbridge Schools Foundation for funding that made it possible to develop the educational architecture to deliver these lessons for Bainbridge Island School District’s Edible Education Initiative.  Thanks to our partners at Heyday Farm, Brian MacWhorter of Butler Green Farms and Tad Mitsui of Heyday Farm Kitchen.

 

 

First Graduates of Leadership in Edible Education

Congratulations to the First Graduates
of our Leadership in Edible Education Certificate Program!

Leadership in Edible Education Certificate Program Graduates, Spring 2016, with LEE Co-Directors. (L-R) Ed Mikel, Angela King, Amber Williams, Stevie Long, Andrew Ely, Jon Garfunkel

Leadership in Education Certificate Program Graduates, Summer 2016, (L-R) Brian Gilbert, Barbara Bolles, Patricia Hennessy.

EduCulture is proud to announce our first graduates of Leadership in Edible Education, who completed this program in Spring and Summer 2016.  Our inaugural 2015-16 cohort attracted a diverse group of Antioch MAEd students and those working in schools, on instructional farms, non-profit organizations, in the food business.  We honor the significant accomplishment of these edible educators, who were the first to complete this EduCulture Certificate Program and Antioch University Concentration, and we celebrate their leadership and work in the field throughout the Puget Sound Region.

Here are the 2015-16 LEE Graduates and their Edible Education Vision Statements:

Barbara Bolles
School Garden Educator; EduCulture Instructor
Cultivating a deep understanding of the interconnecting cycles and systems of life through intimate involvement, students and teachers guide each other to discover the most humane treatment of all living organisms.  Growth is naturally nurtured in all academic disciplines, as well as in cooperation and compassion.  The border between them becomes penetrable as teaching and learning dissolve into each other.

Andrew Ely
Educator & Farmer, 21 Acres
I see a society in which all people, are healthy, are peaceful, are happy.

Edible education provides a foundation of knowledge and skills from which individuals are empowered to act on current ecological, economic and social inequities.

In 25 years I see…
– Public breakfast and lunch programs utilizing onsite and locally produced foods.
– Educational institutions utilizing garden and farm education for all subjects.
– Our communities having easy affordable access to culturally relevant wholesome foods.

Brian Gilbert
Cheesemonger, Beecher’s Cheese
Nature inspires action and a deep connection with our land enabling us to establish relationships in the community through a fundamental sharing of knowledge by engaging in co-education and cross-cultural ideas. As leaders, we collectively inspire children to eat whole foods upon planting and harvesting their own fruits and vegetables and understanding the food process by listening to the rhythm of the seasons and respecting the animals that share their lives to sustain ours.

Reconnecting to the natural traditions of food producers and honoring its antiquity allows us to enjoy gratifying nourishment while appreciating our native culture that the seed created.

We have the opportunity of daily gratitude to be educational caretakers of the earth by sharing locally produced foods. We provide knowledge of where our food is grown, nurtured, picked, packed, and distributed. We believe in sending ‘good vibes’ & enthusiasm through the tonality and presentation of food, leading to local congregation and global unity, balancing our modern life’s pace with humble simplicity, renewable with every sunrise.

When we collectively observe universal truths, explore our individual beliefs of personal identity then together we discover our communities expanding consciousness, evolve within co-creation and begin to taste the essence of our Edible Culture, participating in the celebration of life.

Patricia Hennessy
Founder & Director, Local Food Trust
Food is associated with both palate and appetite.  Palate being the appreciation of taste and flavor and appetite being a natural desire to satisfy a bodily need.  Of course, food intersects both. While a palate can be broad, an appetite can be deep or insatiable.

Edible education offers limitless possibilities to develop a broad palate around math and science, our health and human services, global citizenship, environmental sustainability, culture, arts and geography among other understandings of who we are and our role in a greater good.  Edible education can also satisfy our appetite through allowing us to dive deeper into a particular discipline or subject.  While knowledge of a subject matter in and of itself can simply be a tool for creation or destruction, edible education provides a unique opportunity to engage the learner/educator in a broader sense of self and demands a certain level of responsibility in exchange for its full and comprehensive understanding.

Therefore, the ultimate purpose of edible education is to inform, inspire and engage all ages and is to be inclusive of learners in pursuit of an education and educators pursuing further learning.  Edible education purposely offers a multi-faceted and interdisciplinary approach to an array of issues versus a singular and linear didactic delivery. It intentionally and deliberately instills a sense of accountability to community; local, regional and global all while using food (all facets) as a medium to create and stimulate dialogue, content and understanding of issues that commonly impact all of us as human beings.

In a formal setting (pK-12) edible education is reflected through a hands-on tactile problem solving approach. By doing, tasting, sensing and seeing children develop core academic knowledge that demonstrates mastery of one subject and at the same time build bridges between our commonalities and community.

Edible education can also be presented in an informal setting (community) as well.  In these presentation gardens, kitchens, u-pick farms, CSA’s and other natural settings all offer opportunities for teachable moments.

Angela King
Edible Educator; Instructor, Pure Foods Kids Foundation
Edible education is a truly revolutionary act.

Edible education aims to shift the dominant food culture that has severely impacted the health of ourselves, our communities, and the Earth into one that honors all individuals birthrights to be well; to not only survive but thrive.

Edible education seeks to honor the land by teaching sustainable food practices, communities by acknowledging and giving reverence to cultural heritage and native traditions, and ourselves by developing a deep and intuitive connection to the unchangeable truth that food is our medicine.
Edible education is the key to healing ourselves, our communities, and mother Earth.

Stevie Long
MAEd Candidate, Antioch University Seattle
A growing awareness of Edible Education around the world is crucial to a deeper understanding of personal, physical, mental, and global well-being. We have for too long denied the importance of understanding that food, what we consider food, and how we source, distribute, price, purchase, and consume that food plays in the role of improving or deteriorating our health and planet. Without greater need for the implementation of edible education, and the understanding of the role food plays in our environment, in our cultural, health, and social justice issues we quite honestly will not have the place to discuss and improve upon it. Food is not only a want but a need for all living things. Now is the time to realize that our old understanding of food and its purpose needs to be uprooted and replanted in a new fertile learning environment.

Amber Williams
MAEd Candidate, Antioch University Seattle
The purpose of Edible Education is to educate and reconnect children and adults alike with the source of their food, with hands on experience through the context of science and nature and the world we live in. Through the process of bringing the garden to the kitchen table and then back to the garden, allows for the integration of practical knowledge and growth of the spirit, which taps into the universal idea that good food brings us all together.

Town & Country Market Becomes a Classroom for High School Studies

EduCulture Leverages Local Community as Curriculum for Students

EduCulture has collaborated with Town & Country Market on Bainbridge Island to develop field classes to enrich and enhance food studies for local Bainbridge High School students.  Lessons were developed for the Global Citizenship course, a required senior elective with a third of the curriculum focusing on farming and food, and Advanced Foods, a Career and Technical Education course.

One lesson helps students understand the anatomy of a grocery store through the variety of forms that one food group can take, i.e. fresh (conventional, organic), packaged, prepared, frozen, dried, grab & go. In small groups, students are assigned one of three types of food to survey and study: Kale, Coffee and Pizza.  They record a set of data for each form of food, from price, origin, packaging, and ingredients. After compiling their date, students compare and contrast these various forms to arrive at conclusions regarding best value for money, healthiest choice, best quality, and most ecologically sustainable.

In another lesson, students learn about meal sourcing at the grocery store.  In small groups, students are given an imaginary budget to source two versions of an imaginary group meal (appetizer, main course, dessert) they might eat as college students.  One version is sourced to be prepared from scratch with whole food ingredients.  The second meal is a version sourced from pre-packaged, ready-made items.  Student record their menus for the meals, then analyze their selections based on healthiest choices, best value for money, most enjoyable to prepare and most ecologically sustainable.

We also created a field class for the Global Citizenship curriculum at Middlefield Farm, owned by Town & Country Market and managed by local farmer Brian MacWhorter, where students examine a unique program in local food production for a local grocery store.

The BISD edible education initiative has helped to bridge classroom and community towards a more lived curriculum for local high school students. One that that localizes their global studies in farming and food, and helps prepare these young adults to navigate their food communities as college students.

Thank you to our community partner Town & Country Market for hosting Bainbridge High School classes, and making their store a classroom for local students, especially to Guest Instructor, Vern Nakata, and store manager Rick Pedersen.  Our gratitude to Bainbridge Schools Foundation for funding that made it possible to develop the educational architecture to deliver these lessons for Bainbridge Island School District’s Edible Education Initiative.

 

 

Join us for Summer Farm to Table Dinner in the Fields

 Great company, local food, and wine.

EduCulture’s Summer 2015
Farm to Table Dinner & Farmraiser

Sunday, August 2, 2015
5:00-8:00p

Hosted in the fields of Bainbridge Vineyards
on Suyematsu & Bentryn Family Farms

8989 Day Road East, Bainbridge Island, WA

*****

Know where your food has come from
 through knowing those who produced it for you… Know where your food has come from
 by the very way it tastes: its freshness telling you 
how far it may have traveled
… so that you can stand up for the land
 that has offered it to you. – Gary Nabhan, A Terroir-ist’s Manifesto for Eating in Place

******

Join EduCulture this summer for an authentic farm to table experience in the fields where your food is grown.  Enjoy the pleasure of connecting place and taste, situated on the farmland where the ingredients of your meal are raised. The dinner and dessert will feature what’s ripe and sweet within our regional foodshed at the height of the summer season. This program is part of EduCulture’s effort to respond to a call for community based edible experiences grounded in tasting what we most need to learn about our local and regional foodshed.

Second courseThis foodshed to fork dinner is part of a series of seasonal dinners EduCulture is developing to bring people together around the wild and cultivated food traditions of our Pacific Northwest bioregion, some call Salmon Nation, including from our partner farms.

FT Dinner 7-14 entree

EduCulture is partnering with our Chef in Residence Leslee Pate, of The Food Shed,  and Local Guest Chef, Tad Mitsui, to help shape and deliver a menu built on what is seasonal and regional, all sourced locally, fairly and sustainably.

  • Enjoy a locally grownfarm to fork to cork dinner on Bainbridge Island.
  • Dine among the beautiful fields of Bainbridge Vineyards and Suyematsu & Bentryn Family Farms.
  • The meal will be prepared and presented featuring the ripeness and abundance of the summer season locally sourced from Laughing Crow Farm, Butler Green Farms, Bainbridge Island Farms, Paulson Farms, and other local wild and cultivated landscapes.

A great ending to a wonderful evening together.

The Four Course Menu will feature food prepared on site in a Wood Fired Oven:
1st Course: Oven Fired Focaccia Topped with Chèvre, Zucchini and Caramelized Onions

2nd Course: Heirloom Tomato Salad with Shaved Hard Cheese, Basil and Garlic Olive Oil

Main Course: King Salmon Fillet on an a Bed of Oven Fired Potatoes with Roasted Peppers, Fennel Relish and Wild Flower Butter

Dessert: Chocolate or Lemon Cakes in Jars with Fresh Cream and Raspberry Compote

  • Each course will be paired with slow wine, locally grown and produced by Bainbridge Vineyards.
  • Take a walking tour among the fields that serve as the source of your meal.
  • Appreciate the terroir of your wine while standing among the rows of vines that produced the grapes.
  • Enjoy the company of Betsey Wittick, farmer and winemaker, Laughing Crow Farms and Brian MacWhorter, Farmer, Butler Green Farms
  • Be a part of seeding & supporting EduCulture’s Edible Education Programs in 2015-16.

Raising a toast to a great summer evening.

This special event is a farm-raiser for our 2015-16 Edible Education Programs. 

$95 per person, a portion of which will be tax deductible.

Bring your friends, family, or even better – gift someone a place at the table.

To reserve your place at the table, please contact EduCulture at 206-780-5797 or admin@EduCultureProject.org.  Seating is limited.

Enjoying the last rays of sun over the hill.

Leadership in Edible Education Taking Root

EduCulture and Antioch University Seattle launch a new
Leadership in Edible Education Certificate Program
to serve K-12 and Community Based Education in the Puget Sound Region

Through an on-going partnership with the Master of Arts in Education Program at Antioch University Seattle, and their professional endorsement program in Environmental and Sustainability Education, EduCulture is launching a groundbreaking Leadership in Edible Education Certificate Program, designed for formal and informal educators, and other professionals, who are interested in making a difference through edible education, in schools and the wider community.

Edible Education encompasses the entire way we think about food in schools, from wellness policies to the quality of school lunch, from the content of core curriculum to career and technical education, from school gardens to food waste recycling, and from the ecology of a school campus to our wider food community.  It is one area of education that threads through all aspects of school culture, from what and where students learn to what they eat, to how they recycle.  Just as our school food chains reflect the wider community food chains that support them, so does the culture of the curriculum have the opportunity to connect with the culture of the school and the wider community.

Farm,tug of war 1

In the 21st century, edible education has become the vanguard and crossroads of many fields of education, from environmental to sustainability, social to global, experiential to vocational, outdoor to horticultural, health and nutrition to school lunch reform.  Food is a topic of study that can be found across the curriculum and embedded, implicitly and explicitly, across standards and grade levels. Its roots in American education date back a century to the development of home economics.  In 1900, the educator John Dewey suggested that the “school itself shall be made a genuine form of active community life, instead of a place set apart in which to learn lessons.” (School and Society) More than a century later, his wisdom still rings true.
The Leadership in Edible Education Certificate Program aims to help define this evolving field of study, examine best practices and programmatic landscapes, and help students find a place for themselves in this growing educational movement.
Antioch University Seattle has been a dedicated partner in the development of this Leadership Program.  “Our Masters Program and indeed the whole campus is quite excited about this first-ever professional education initiative,” said Ed Mikel of Antioch U., co-founder and director of this program.  “It represents an area of primary study, practice, policy, and everyday life that is vital to the health and well-being of all peoples and, indeed, the whole web of life on earth.”

 FFCE10, final dialogue

“We are looking to attract the trailblazers in edible education who want to reflect on and deepen their practice, as well as those new or on the fringes of this emerging field who want to make a difference but need an educational grounding to enter into this field,” says EduCulture’s Jon Garfunkel, who co-founded this program with Ed Mikel.

“We are building a professional learning community for classroom teachers who want to get their students out to the garden or farm, the Food Service Directors who want to build a CTE program for students to learn and work in the school kitchen, the farmers or leaders in the food community who see education as part of their mission and vision. This Leadership Program is about enhancing and enriching school and community wellness by connecting place and taste to how we live, eat and learn.”

FFCEbeans

This Leadership in Edible Education Program carries the follow aims and objectives:

  • Building professional repertoires
  • Focus on Culture of Curriculum, Culture of Schools and Culture of Communities
  • Becoming an educational laboratory and community brain trust
  • Bridging Classroom & Communities
  • Building Learning Communities
  • Cultivating school and community leadership
  • Calling upon the emerging expertise of participants
  • Lived field studies centered in actual school and community programs
  • Serving multiple sectors and stakeholders
  • Education for Social Justice & Community Heritage
  • Reclaiming parts of our past in order to seed our future
  • Strengthening and preserving our regional and local food communities
  • Educating this and future generations of co-producers

Carrots

This certificate is spread over four quarterly courses aimed at building the professional repertoire of those who seek to work in the field of edible education.

Summer 2015 (July 9, 16, 23, 30), Leadership in Edible Education I
Education Towards Food, Citizenship & Community

Fall 2015 (Sept.-Nov.), Leadership in Edible Education II
Food in Schools and Postsecondary Institutions

Winter 2016 (Jan.-March), Leadership in Edible Education III
Edible Education I: Theory & Practice

Spring 2016 (April-June), Leadership in Edible Education IV
Edible Education II: Field Experience & Culminating Field Project

This program is open to formal and informal educators. Field classes for each quarterly course will be held over four days, alternating between Seattle and Bainbridge Island/Kitsap.  Course work is offered in multiple professional education options, from AUS Degree and Environmental & Sustainability Education Endorsement Credit to Continuing Education Credits and Clock hours.  There is also a Core Field Course option for informal educators or those not needing credit. The Leadership in Edible Education Certificate of Completion is received through participation in all four courses. Courses I-III may be taken independently with same credit options. Scholarships have been made available for people of color to participate in this program.  We also have reduced tuition options for people based on financial need.

To learn more about the Leadership in Edible Education Certificate Program, visit our website: http://educultureproject.org/leadership-in-edible-education/

To learn more about the first course in the program, Education Towards Food , Citizenship & Community, offered this summer, visit our website:
http://educultureproject.org/education-to-food-citizenship-and-community/

To inquire or register for this program, contact: admin@EducultureProject.org or call 206-780-5797

For more about Antioch University Seattle’s degree/endorsement options, contact: emikel@Antioch.edu

EduCulture’s on Bainbridge Community Radio

EduCulture’s Managing Director, Jon Garfunkel, was interviewed for a podcast on Bainbridge Community Broadcasting, a new local media outlet in the community.  The interview was conducted on July 25, 2014.  It is a nice introduction to the work of EduCulture and features a discussion about our upcoming Farm to Table Dinner on August 2.

Click on the radio player below to listen to the podcast:


Thank you to Ellen Miyasato, Lyssa Danehy deHart, and Barry Peters from Bainbridge Community Broadcasting for such a welcoming radio experience!

Click here to learn more about Bainbridge Community Broadcasting and to listen to the podcast via their website. 

 

Farm to Fork to Cork Dinner, August 2, Bainbridge Island

Food2454

Saturday, August 2, 5:30-8:30p
Hosted at Bainbridge Vineyards on Suyematsu & Bentryn Family Farms
8989 Day Road East, Bainbridge Island, WA

**********
Know where your food has come from
 through knowing those who produced it for you…
 Know where your food has come from
 by the very way it tastes:
its freshness telling you 
how far it may have traveled
…
so that you can stand up for the land
 that has offered it to you.
– Gary Nabhan, A Terroir-ist’s Manifesto for Eating in Place

**********

Join EduCulture this summer for an authentic foodshed to table experience, and have the pleasure of connecting place and taste, situated among the very fields where the ingredients of your meal are raised. The meal and tour will feature what’s ripe and sweet within our regional foodshed this summer season.

FarmView1

  • Enjoy a locally grown, farm to fork to cork dinner on Bainbridge Island.
  • Dine on the beautiful fields of Bainbridge Vineyards.
  • The meal will be prepared and presented by regionally renowned Food Shed, featuring the ripeness and abundance of the summer season.
  • The food will be locally sourced from Laughing Crow Farm, Butler Green Farms, Bainbridge Farms, and other local wild and cultivated landscapes.
  • Each course will be paired with slow wine, locally grown and produced by Bainbridge Vineyards.
  • Take a walking tour among the fields that serve as the source of your meal.  Appreciate the terroir of your wine while standing among the rows of vines that produced the grapes.
  • Enjoy the company of the farmer and winemaker, Betsey Wittick.
  • Be a part of seeding & supporting EduCulture’s Edible Education Programs in 2014-15.

IMG_1759

This foodshed to fork dinner is part of a series of seasonal dinners EduCulture is developing to bring people together around the wild and cultivated food traditions of our Pacific Northwest bioregion, some call Salmon Nation, including from our partner farms.  EduCulture is partnering with The Food Shed to help shape and deliver a menu built on what is seasonal and regional, all sourced locally, fairly and sustainably. 

Menu

Each course will be paired with wine locally grown and produced by Bainbridge Vineyards.

Appetizers  

  • Handmade Bread and Crackers with three spreads: Beet Hummus, Roasted Pepper and Currant and Cheese
  • Curried Jade Dumplings and Fresh Island Spring Rolls with Soy Lime Chili, Hoisen Sesame, and Peanut Dipping Sauces

Salad Course 

  • Kale and Shredded Beet and Cabbage Salad with Ginger Sesame Dressing and Iggy’s Kimchee

Dinner 

  • Salmon Cakes
  • Green Beans tossed with butter, garlic and Edamame
  • Thin sliced roasted potatoes

(with Ponzu sauce and Iggy’s Sushi Kraut and fresh sprouts

Dessert

  • Matcha Green Tea Cakes with hand crafted Island Strawberry Ice Cream and fresh Rhubarb Sauce

 Click on the player below or here to listen to a podcast on
Bainbridge Community Radio about this upcoming dinner.

This special event is a farm-raiser for our 2014-15 Edible Education Programs. $95 per person, a portion of which will be tax deductible.

Bring your friends, family, or even better – gift someone a place at the table.

To reserve your place at the table, please contact EduCulture at 206-780-5797 or admin@EduCultureProject.org.  Seating is limited to 30 guests.

IMG_4364

Setting the Table for a Foodshed Series This foodshed to fork dinner is part of a series of seasonal dinners aimed at bring people together around the wild and cultivated food traditions of our Pacific Northwest bioregion, some call Salmon Nation, and eating what we most need to learn.

EduCulture is partnering with The Food Shed to help shape and deliver a menu built on what is seasonal and regional, all sourced locally, fairly and sustainably. In the spirit of creating convivia, each dinner will focus on a foodshed theme and will feature local producers, storytellers, or artists who will feed us with words, music, and  ideas.

This program is part of EduCulture’s effort to respond to a call for community based edible experiences grounded in tasting what we most need to learn about our local and regional foodshed.

Click here to read about our Winter Foodshed to Table Dinner.

IMG_2886

About The Food Shed The Food Shed’s objective is to cultivate conscious consumption by advocating local and sustainable food sources and cycles. They strive to be stewards of our own foodshed by providing local food experiences, enriching relationships between micro-producers, growers and local consumers, and modeling a “cradle to cradle” food hub that is centered in a deep local economy. The Food Shed makes sure every step along the food chain, from production to recycling, works in a cyclical and durable progression. We are working to pioneer new ways of collaboration and food interdependence, which in turn encourages farm literacy and folk culture and micro economic viability from the root of the community. To learn more about The Food Shed, visit www.KitsapFoodShed.com or see their Facebook page.

 

Student Sown Potatoes for Bite of Bainbridge, Nov. 26

In 2010, EduCulture broke new ground by helping to start the Bite of Bainbridge program with the Bainbridge Island School District. Each year, hundreds of pounds of produce grown by Island students and farmers are featured in the school lunch program.

IMG_4688

In early October, locally grown corn raised by Karen Selvar of Bainbridge Island Farms (BHS Class of ’82) was served in school lunches throughout the school district.

BISD once again purchased 300 pounds of Akio Suyematsu’s Raspberries (BHS Class of ’42, raised by Karen Selvar since Akio’s passing), served at Bainbridge High School in yogurt and granola parfaits. The raspberries are also served at Sakai and Woodward Schools as a topping for waffles during their Breakfast for Lunch specials.

On November 26, the featured Bite of Bainbridge in Island Elementary Schools will be locally grown and student sown potatoes, seeded last spring and harvested this fall by more than 20 K-4 classes from Wilkes, Ordway and Blakely Elementary Schools. These Cherry Red, Purple Caribe, and Yukon Gold potatoes were raised organically at our edible education plots at Butler Green Farms on Morales Farm and Heyday Farm on McDonald Avenue.

Click here to read the BISD elementary school menu for Nov. 26.

IMG_4227

On Bainbridge Island, we are fortunate to have a continuum of school and community that goes back over 150 years. What is extra special about our Bite of Bainbridge program is how locally grown and intergenerational it has become. We are fortunate to be in a school district in which food served in our school lunches is being raised by three generations who grew up on this Island and representing nine decades of educational and agricultural life in our local community.

We are proud to have had a role in building the bridges to create a dedicated locally grown school food stream within the Bainbridge School District. While still “bites,” they represent a significant place in the school food chain, and allow students to have learning experiences, from production to processing to distribution to consumption. What started for these young people as an educational act, is not only feeding their minds, it is also feeding their bodies.

 IMG_4070

It may be small in servings right now, but the Bite of Bainbridge program packs a full educational meal. This program is becoming a model of school-community partnerships on both public and private farmlands. Each year, with the continued support from our school, farm and community stakeholders, we are moving the Bite of Bainbridge program from the novelty to the norm.

EduCulture is grateful to the many program partners who play an important role in making this Bite of Bainbridge possible, from the farm to the classroom to the lunchroom:

  • Students, Teachers, Administrators and Parents from Wilkes, Ordway & Blakely Elementary Schools
  • Brian MacWhorter and Staff, Butler Green Farms at Morales Farm
  • Craig & Alice Skipton and Staff, Heyday Farms
  • Mark Sperazza, Director of Child Nutrition Services for BISD
  • Kitchen Staff at Sakai, Woodward and Bainbridge High Schools
  • Bainbridge Island School District
  • City of Bainbridge Island
  • Bainbridge Island Farms
  • Suyematsu Farms
  • Friends of the Farms
  • Bainbridge One Call for All

 

EduCulture Makes Field Trip to Edible Schoolyard in Berkeley, CA

Amongst the many farm-school field experiences we were facilitating on Bainbridge Island, a team from EduCulture took a professional field trip of our own.  On October 21, Board Member Ed Mikel, also representing Antioch University Seattle, Leslee Pate, program partner from the Food Shed, and myself (JG) spent the day in Berkeley, CA visiting the original Edible Schoolyard at Martin Luther King, Jr. Middle School and engaging in a professional dialogue with staff from the Edible Schoolyard Project.

The Edible Schoolyard is the vision of Alice Waters, renowned culinary innovator and grandmother of the edible education movement.  Her vision has not only become a locally grown reality for a public middle school in her Berkeley community, it has become a model for what edible education can look like at any school. Over the past few years, I have had the honor of connecting with Alice Waters as a delegate to Terra Madre, in Turin, Italy during 2010 & 2012.  Her principles of edible education have been closely aligned with EduCulture’s, and the mission of the Edible Schoolyard has served as a great inspiration for our locally grown work.

ESY

Jon Garfunkel and Alice Waters at Terra Madre 2010

Over this past summer, we were approached by the Edible Schoolyard Project and began a meaningful professional dialogue with their staff that led to this special opportunity for a site visit and deeper discussion with ESY staff about the current and future state of edible education.

ESY Garden[1] The Edible Schoolyard garden at MLK Jr. Middle School, Berkeley, CA

Bearing witness to what has been cultivated at MLK Middle School, from the school garden to the classroom kitchen, was a tremendous professional treat for our team.  The one-acre garden replaced an old school parking lot and now includes a greenhouse, chicken coop, and African style bee hives, along with a variety of vegetables and fruits that make their way into the classroom kitchen and sometimes school lunch. The garden is well integrated into the school campus and is open to the neighborhood community when school is not is session. The 900 students in grades 6-8 cycle through a 5-7 week garden based curriculum followed by a similar kitchen based curriculum each school year that is directly connected to their core curriculum in math, science and social studies.

Short Video of the Edible Schoolyard Kitchen

The way the ESY Berkeley staff and MLK Middle School teachers have created a culture of curriculum that is threaded within the culture of the school and culture of the community is truly impressive.  ESY Project operates a global web based hub for edible education across the planet. I also admired the way they are striving to frame all of this work within the formal K-12 landscape, in a series of concentric circles of professional relationships from the classroom to school to district to state to nation, and beyond.

ESY Visit Signs[1]Colorful signs identify the garden’s fruits and vegetables

It was a treat to talk shop with the ESY team, who left us much to chew on.  In reflecting on this experience, it was powerful and meaningful to see the parallels in our approaches to edible education, given the respective paths each of our projects has taken in developing.  We all left feeling professionally fed and nourished with a fuller well of educational energy and inspiration.

We are grateful for the gracious hospitality extended to our EduCulture team, and look forward to developing program opportunities to collaborate with ESY.

 

ESYGroupPhoto[1](L-R) Ed Mikel (Global Source Board Member & Antioch University Seattle Faculty), Emilie Gioia (Digital Director of ESY Project), Jon Garfunkel, and Kyle Cornforth (Director of ESY Berkeley) after a meaningful professional dialogue at the ESY Campus.

Click here for more about the Edible Schoolyard Project 

Click here for more about Terra Madre